From our series celebrating the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac

The pig is the sixth design in the series, and is the twelfth and final sign of the Chinese zodiac, appearing once every 12 years. Harry Brockway, the coin’s designer, has ensured qualities of people born in the Year of the Pig are evident in his design. Behind the sow, who is lying comfortably with her children who are feeding, is a countryside landscape at night, featuring a traditional country home. This design shows the generosity, compassion and diligence associated with people born in the Year of the Pig, and defines their relationships with those close to them. The country home signifies the trait of feeling calm, through the drowsy night sky and smoke emanating from the warm fire within the home.

Silver Proof
Lunar Year of the Pig 2019 UK Five-Ounce Silver Proof Coin

Price: £420.00

No Longer Available

Silver Proof
Lunar Year of the Pig 2019 UK Silver Proof Kilo Coin
2019

Price: £2,270.00

No Longer Available

Find your Animal

Which animal are you?

Lunar Year of the Dog

Gold Proof
Lunar Year of the Dog 2018 UK One Ounce Gold Proof Coin
2018

Price: £2,425.00

No Longer Available

Gold Proof
Lunar Year of the Dog 2018 UK Five Ounce Gold Proof Coin
2018

Price: £10,525.00

Limited Stock

Lunar Year of the Rooster

Gold Proof
Lunar Year of the Rooster 2017 UK One Ounce Gold Proof Coin
2017

Price: £2,425.00

No Longer Available

100% Reserved

Gold Proof
Lunar Year of the Rooster 2017 UK Five Ounce Gold Proof Coin

Price: £9,995.00

No Longer Available

Silver Proof
Lunar Year of the Rooster 2017 UK Five Ounce Silver Proof Coin

Price: £420.00

No Longer Available

Discover More

In 2014 The Royal Mint united these British and Chinese traditions to create the first official UK Lunar coins. The Shēngxiào Collection, named after the Chinese zodiac, is based upon 12 animals that have their own unique characteristics and qualities.

East Meets West

If you were to search for ‘Shēngxiào’ on the internet you would find The Royal Mint’s range of lunar coins.

Coins have been produced in the Far East in some form or another for thousands of years, just like they have in Britain. Both cultures have traditionally used coins in celebrations and family events, and while these customs date back over centuries, a new generation are embracing the ancient practices in a modern way.

In the United Kingdom coins are often the gift of choice for a special occasion. Brides traditionally tuck a sixpence into their shoe for good luck, and silver gifts are given to newborns and at christenings – inspired by the centuries-old custom of giving silver coins to a baby for good luck.

How will you celebrate Chinese New Year?


Fireworks

Fireworks

It is traditional to light fireworks on the first day of festivities, to chase away evil spirits.

Red Envelopes

Red Envelopes

Red packages are sometimes given to relatives at family dinners. They often contain gifts of money in amounts that are considered to reflect good luck.

Dances

Dances

Dragon and lion dances are common during Chinese New Year. It is thought that the colourful masks and beat of the drums will ward off bad spirits.

Red Lanterns

Red Lanterns

After fifteen days the Chinese New Year celebrations end with the Lantern Festival.

 

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