1983 Royal Arms One Pound Coin

The Royal Arms representing the United Kingdom £1 Coin

1983 £1

Issued 1983, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008
Diameter 22.5mm
Weight 9.5 g
Thickness 3.15mm
Composition Nickel-Brass
(70% copper, 5.5%
nickel, 24.5% zinc)
Obverse Designers Portrait of Her Majesty the Queen
1983-1984 Arnold Machin
1985- 1997 Raphael Maklouf
1998 to date Ian Rank-Broadley
Reverse Designer Eric Sewell
Edge Inscription 'An ornament and a safeguard'
Edge Milled
Mintages 1983: 443,053,510
  1993: 114,744,500
  1998: Not issued
  2003: 61,596,500
  2008: 3,910,000*

About This Design

The £1 coin in base metal, nickel-brass was introduced in 1983, as a replacement for the £1 banknote. The reverse design of the first £1 coin showed a detailed and intricate depiction of the Royal Coat of Arms. Designed by Eric Sewell, Chief Engraver at The Royal Mint, it has become one of the most famous images on British coinage. The coin’s edge inscription is in Latin ‘DECUS ET TUTAMEN’ which may be translated as an ‘ornament to safeguard’. 

History Of The £1

By 1980 it had become apparent that with the general decline in purchasing power, the £1 unit of currency was more appropriate to a coin than a banknote. After consultation with many groups including retailers and special interest groups, the Government announced on 31 July 1981 that a new £1 coin that was to be issued on 21 April 1983. Since its launch the £1 has always represented the United Kingdom and its constituent parts; England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.